As we told you when our Local MMA recaps began, “ProFightingFans.com has teamed up with our friends at Ohio MMA News – along with our great sponsors at Intimidation Clothing – to begin working every week to round up the best local MMA coverage on the ‘net as a sort of link sharing combined with awesome-sharing for our fans.” Along with CarnalDaMMAge.com, a leading online retailer of MMA tees & gear, as a Local MMA Recap sponsor. This weekend the regional MMA scene continued with several events as we head into a few busy weeks in mid-August and an expanded slate of local MMA events. Also, be sure to check out the new Support Local MMA tee from our sponsors at Intimidation Clothing.

Intimidation Clothing - Local MMAThis week’s Local MMA Roundup features articles from our friends at Cage Passion Media, Bluegrass MMA, StandThemUp, Promoting Real Women, and more.

  • AAMMA 34 results from Williamstown, Kentucky [Cage Passion]
  • UVC announces next show for Nov. 2 in Columbus [BluegrassMMA]
  • 1 on 1 with Justin “The Hawk” Steave [StandThemUp]
  • Ohio fighters Brown, Spohn, & more featured in music video [Ohio MMA News]
  • Jessaymn Duke spotlighted in Ultimate MMA magazine [BluegrassMMA]
  • Jackson’s MMA Series 11 results from New Mexico [MMAmadhouse]
  • Tri-state showdown bringing MMA superstars to Indiana [BluegrassMMA]

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @ProFightingFans for more updates.

As we told you a few weeks ago “ProFightingFans.com has teamed up with our friends at Ohio MMA News – along with our great sponsors at Intimidation Clothing – to begin working every week to round up the best local MMA coverage on the ‘net as a sort of link sharing combined with awesome-sharing for our fans.” This week we add CarnalDaMMAge.com, a leading online retailer of MMA training gear & shirts, as a Local MMA Recap sponsor. This weekend the regional MMA scene continued with several events as we head into a busy August and an expanded slate of local MMA events.

Intimidation - Local MMAThis week’s edition features stories from BluegrassMMA, MMA Madhouse, and of course Ohio MMA News.

  • Rock N Rumble 7 headliners set with two rematches [Ohio MMA News]
  • MMA in Ohio: The Columbus Dispatch investigates [Ohio MMA News]
  • Results: Midwest Fight Series – Friday Night Fights [Cage Craze]
  • 4 huge pro fights announced for MMA Goes Country event [BluegrassMMA]
  • World Series of Fighting – Central America results [MMAmadhouse]
  • Full card released for NAAFS: Caged Vengeance 14 [Ohio MMA News]
  • PinnacleFC: Promo video for August 24th [StandThemUp]

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @ProFightingFans for more updates.

As we told you a few weeks ago “ProFightingFans.com has teamed up with our friends at Ohio MMA News – along with our great sponsors at Intimidation Clothing – to begin working every week to round up the best local MMA coverage on the ‘net as a sort of link sharing combined with awesome-sharing for our fans.” This week we add CarnalDaMMAge.com, a leading online retailer of MMA training gear & t shirts, as a Local MMA Recap sponsor. This weekend the regional MMA scene picked up a bit as we head into the second half of July and an expanded slate of local MMA events.

This week’s edition features stories from BluegrassMMA, MMA Madhouse, Promoting Real Women, and of course Ohio MMA News.

  • Video: Justin Steave vs. Mike Diggs from PinnacleFC 3 [StandThemUp]
  • Jeremy Kitts vs. Derek Morgan co-headlines UVC 24 on July 27 [Ohio MMA News]
  • Josh “Taz” Ferguson back in action at Hardrock MMA 57 [BluegrassMMA]
  • Lou Neglia’s Ring of Combat in the market for TV deal [MMA Madhouse]
  • Wes Hanson to meet Jason Lawrence at NAAFS Caged Vengeance 14 [BluegrassMMA]
  • Results from Arena FC in New Port Richey, FL [MMA Madhouse]

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @ProFightingFans for more updates.

 

As we told you last week “ProFightingFans.com has teamed up with our friends at Ohio MMA News – along with our great sponsors at Intimidation Clothing – to begin working every week to round up the best local MMA coverage on the ‘net as a sort of link sharing combined with awesome-sharing for our fans.” While this week we are a couple days late posting the weekend recap, the slow weekend in regional MMA makes it easier to justify.

This week’s edition features stories from BluegrassMMA, StandThemUp, MMA Madhouse, Promoting Real Women, and of course Ohio MMA News.

  • 5 female bouts announced for AAMMA 34 on August 10 [BluegrassMMA]
  • Results from Prison City Fight League in Jackson, MI [MMA Madhouse]
  • UVC 24 set for July 27 in Columbus, Spohn vs. Penn headlines [Ohio MMA News]
  • The Ohio Valley’s top 10 fights from June 2013 [BluegrassMMA]
  • Photos from PinnacleFC 3 provided by LandryLynnePhotos.com [StandThemUp]
  • RFO returns August 31 with Stevens-Neace, Lane-Law, more [Ohio MMA News]
  • Wolfie Steele captures Muay Thai title in Iowa [BluegrassMMA]

Be sure to follow us on Twitter @ProFightingFans for more updates

ProFightingFans.com has teamed up with our friends at Ohio MMA News – along with our great sponsors at Intimidation Clothing – to begin working every week to round up the best local MMA coverage on the ‘net as a sort of link sharing combined with awesome-sharing for our fans. Our goal is to accumulate the best local MMA news from all over the country. This will be a weekly post, and it will be a work in progress as we begin to bring other outlets into the foray to keep it fresh and also bring you the biggest and best stories.

This week’s debut post features stories from a mIntimidation - Local MMAurderer’s row of the top local MMA sites from across the country, including OHMMA.com, Bluegrass MMA, StandThemUp, MMA Madhouse, MMA-Insider, The MMA Corner and more.

  • Recap – Results from Pittsburgh Challenge Series 3 in Canonsburg, PA [BluegrassMMA]
  • Video – Mark Cherico earns a second round TKO over Donny Walker at Pittsburgh Challenge Series 3 [StandThemUp]
  • After vacation, Mark Cherico is ready to make his push to the UFC [Ohio MMA News]
  • Video – Khama Worthy takes out Francis Healy with a second round TKO at Pittsburgh Challenge Series 3 [StandThemUp]
  • After four straight wins, Justin Steave feels like he’s finally ready for UFC-caliber competiton [Ohio MMA News]
  • Results from Ninja Fighting Championship 3 in Bristol, VA [MMA-Insider]
  • Dustin Parrish is set to defend title against Sean Fallon at Art of War 7 in Indiana [BluegrassMMA]
  • Results from Havoc at the High Five 2 in Burnsville, MN [MMA Madhouse]
  • Photo gallery from Sparta Combat League in Greeley, CO [The MMA Corner]
  • Results from Valor Kickboxing 6 in Pigeon Forge, TN [MMA-Insider]

 

By David McKinney

If you would like your website to be included in the Local MMA Roundup, please send an email to mckinneypublicrelations@gmail.com.

Follow @OhioMMANews

The Ohio MMA faithful gathered Friday in the state capital of Columbus for a night of closely contested bouts that were a testament to the prowess of Ultimate Victory Challenge matchmakerTyler Wooten, who assembled one of the best cards of the year.  It was the marquis Professional talent of some of The Buckeye State’s biggest guns that put the sparkle on a card stacked top to bottom, anchored by solid performances from some of the best Amateur talent from the area. The result was a night of fights that more than made up for a lack of flashy KO victories by pitting evenly matched opponents head to head, producing some of the more stylish and robust ground-fighting in recent memory.

Four spirited amateur contests kicked off the action, setting the stage for six pro bouts that eventually delivered fireworks culminating in stellar performances by the city’s native sons, Dan Spohn and Luke Zachrich in the co-main event and main events of the evening. MMA enthusiast Loper from 99.7 The Blitz’ “Loper and Randi in the Morning” served as emcee, riling up fans with his contagious mixture of intensity and love for the fight game, well matched by the styling’s of colorful ring announcer George Phillips. Add to it a patently fight and fan-friendly venue in the vibrant and well-appointed Aladdin Shrine Center, and more than a thousand rabid MMA fans of all shapes, sizes and colors, and UVC 23 – Invasion was a smashing success and the place to be last night.

 

AMATEUR BOUTS

DiSabattoMMA’s Jordan Schembri and LAMMA product Austin Durbinkicked off the action with a agonizing 2 minute, 10 second affair throughout which Durbin struggled for a single-leg takedown like his life depended on it, absorbing punishing strikes from Schembri all the while. When he finally let go the leg, Durbin quickly found himself on the wrong end of a powerful North/South choke, tapping out at 2:10 of the very first round.

Toward the end of a back and forth Round 1 featuring transitions and submission attempts from both fighters, Skrap House amateur journeyman Ronnie Shoemaker gained an advantage over LAMMA’sJeff Dotsonand went on to dominate Round 2, taking Dotson’s back and sinking in an unforgiving rear-naked choke to earn the tap at 1:38 of the second stanza.

The next two amateur bouts would both last the duration with undefeated local standouts Corey Dulaney and Robert McPherson pitting their perfect records against each other in a UVC Champion Series Lightweight Semi-final and amateur champ Aaron Hughes ending a 19-month layoff versus veteran Donny Korbel in a non-title icebreaker.

Dulaney v. McPherson heated up gradually with McPherson sporting superior technical chops in finally executing a sweep minutes into the first round and cinching up a neat triangle choke which a determined and physically dominant Dulaney rode out until the bell at the end of Round 1 brought merciful relief. The formidable athleticism and grinding pressure of Dulaney was gradually brought to bear when in the midst of Round 2 he executed a thunderous scoop and slam which seemed to be the tipping point. From there on, Dulaney out-muscled his opponent en route to a unanimous decision victory on the strength of his explosive power and superior control. The victory established Dulaney’s status as the number one contender at lightweight.

Ring rust may have been a factor in the return of Aaron “Livewire” Hughes in spite of what was an admirable performance in which he landed takedowns in multiple rounds and held top-control much of the bout. Still, it was the diverse attack of Donny “The Destroyer” Korbel that was the story of this one, the Team Chaos product showcasing a balanced arsenal of both striking and grappling. On the feet, Korbel used his rangy limbs with precision, mixing up leg-kicks with his hands, doing excellent body work and landing a heavy kick to the body before hurting Hughes with a straight-right to the breadbasket and finishing Round 1 in top position. Round 2 was a slugfest with some calculated brawling at the outset before Hughes sensed he was fighting to his opponent’s strengths and again took it to the mat. Here Hughes mounted his greatest real threat of the fight coming close with a guillotine choke before the bell.  Hughes quickly got the takedown and established dominant position from the outset of Round 3. He did little damage, however, thus it was again the more treacherous triangle choke/armbar with which Korbel nearly submitted and eventually swept Hughes that was the offensive highlight of the round for me. While he did spend much of the fight on his back, Korbel scored big fan points on my unofficial card for his stylish ground game, which allowed him to create reversals and submission attempts while sustaining very little damage.

The Judges Harry Heil and Darryl Wise scored the fight 29-28 in favor of Korbel while judge Jeannie McGinnis scored it 29-28 for Hughes. It was perhaps the most intellectually provocative fight of the evening for me in that it highlighted what are nagging frustrations with the scoring of MMA bouts. I would venture to guess that all 3 judges gave Round 2 to Korbel on the basis of his dominance in the striking in a round contested largely on the feet. And yet it was in Round 2 that Hughes came closest to ending the fight with a guillotine choke cut short by the bell. In Rounds 1 and 3, Hughes clearly held a preponderance of time in the top (dominant?) position, but did little damage due to Korbel’soffensive guard which produced both sweeps leading to full-mount and a near submission by triangle choke then armbar. In fact, the only time at which Korbel looked unstable was when Hughes rattled Korbel’sscrobles with a kick to the marbles before the fight hardly got started, which still must’ve smarted. But seriously, there is something to be said for offense that threatens to end a fight versus “dominance” which merely stagnates a fight by limiting the time that the “dominant” fighter is in immediate danger from a superior striker or submission grappler. And although a majority of judges (in my opinion), got the winner right, it’s probably reasonable to assume that one judge gave Hughes both Rounds 1 and 3, but not 2, and the other two gave Hughes only Round 1 or 3.  So if coming close to ending the fight counts for more than merely staying out of danger by controlling position, even the judges that got the score right most likely did so for the wrong reason. I would argue for a score of 30-27 in favor of Korbel as the damage inflicted with his strikes outweighed the near submission attempt in Round 2. Live action is fast and furious and distractions cageside are many, so I reserve the right to change my mind upon viewing the televised rebroadcast, a luxury the judges do not enjoy. Suffice to say that imperfect though they sometimes may be, I do not envy their job in adjudicating closely fought decisions under an inherently flawed scoring system with ambiguous judging criteria. It’s a wonder they can sleep at night.

 

PROFESSIONAL BOUTS

Matt Anderson v. JeramyKarshner was a vigorous back-and-forth grappling match featuring some nice clinch work by Anderson and a skillful takedown by Karshner in Round 1.  Anderson dazed Karshner with a flying-knee to open the second frame, but was unable to finish him as Karshner regained his wits and gutted out another nice takedown only to be stood up for inaction. Anderson again landed an effective kick, this time to the head of Karshner who powered through yet again, scoring another gutsy takedown. A perhaps still-dazed Karshner quickly found himself in a triangle choke from which Anderson neatly transitioned into a slick armbar, forcing the tap at 4:50 of Round 2 with just 10 seconds remaining in the round.

Corey “Koko” Simmons v. Cornelius Godfrey was a fight that promised fireworks on paper but delivered an uninspiring clinch-war long on posturing and short on striking.  Godfrey manhandled Simmons against the cage but landed only a handful of significant strikes in the fight, preferring instead to out-leverage his opponent to little consequence. Round 2 yielded an eventual takedown for Godfrey but Simmons struggled to his feet quickly, eating a few decent knees for his efforts but ultimately sustaining little damage. A second takedown near the end of the round was little cause for excitement, but served to further establish the dominance of Godfrey. Although Simmons eventually managed a takedown of his own, Round 3 was more of the same, Godfrey rag-dolling his opponent in an impressive yet lackluster display of strength and leverage, earning another 2 takedowns but nothing for the highlight reel. Simmons worked hard at landing a liver punch, his only effective weapon in the fight, although by then one sensed he was in desperation mode, hoping for a big punch that never came. In spite of a conservative approach, Godfrey notched another mark in the win column, all three judges scoring the bout 29-28 in his favor. He should not, however, be criticized for what was a strategic if not flashy performance, especially against a last-minute opponent and dangerous striker, and I look for this talented young fighter to dazzle crowds when he finds himself in a more favorable stylistic matchup.The striking of Simmons holds similar promise when he is not at the mercy of a longer fighter more adept in the subtleties of Greco style grappling than himself.

Tyson Triplett v. Marc Cofer was a little short on excitement, as well, perhaps as Cofer dominated all 3 rounds with superior takedowns and positional grappling. Despite some spirited striking exchanges that Triplett mostly got the better of, including some good elbows from bottom position, Cofer’s wrestling was simply too much, earning him a unanimous decision on the scorecard. All in all, it was a convincing victory for the formidable wrestler as well as an admirable display of sportsmanship and mutual respect from two seemingly amiable fellows who clearly enjoy their shared craft.

Augusta Tindall v. Joe Heiland brought an abrupt close to any perceived lack of violence, risk-taking and heroicism with a whirlwind of frenzied action that went the distance in a visceral display of brutality and determination. Tindall took the part of fearsome striker with lightning in his hands and acrobatic takedown defense to match.  “Gus” struggled valiantly to maintain striking distance against a relentless onslaught of pressure and takedown attempts from a very aggressive, iron-jawed opponent in Heiland who ate several bombs while delivering a few of his own. “Smokin Joe” fought to close the distance with dogged determination, landing several monstrous takedowns only to see Tindall repeatedly scramble back to his feet to deliver more punishing blows. Relentlessly closing the distance again, Heiland came near to securing a standing arm triangle for a tense period that seemed like an eternity before making good on yet another takedown attempt at the end of the first round. Cleveland’s Heilandwas a fitting embodiment of the venerable Strong Style name, continuing with his takedowns and clinch work, nearly taking the back of his opponent several times, but unable to hold the position. A well-timed knee to the face of his opponent sent Tindall’smouthpieceflying across the cage. Gusturned the tides late in Round 2 landing consecutive clean shots after referee Mark Matheny broke the fighters to replace the lost mouthpiece during an appropriate paused in the action. Tindall had Heiland hurt during the barrage of strikes that followed but Heiland was somehow able to compose himself again, elevating and slamming Tindallin epic fashion. Round 3 belonged to Tindallwho still had devastating hand speed and power enough to rock his opponent savagely, unleashing a menacing variety of combinations at a staggered Heiland. Several glancing blowsalmost finished him butHeiland’s iron jaw and iron will refused to quit. For an eternity it seemed Tindall was one clean shot away from a devastating KO, the audience collectively breathless as if watching a confused animal crossing an interstate, waiting for the worst. But Heiland whether consciously or by the grace of some other power miraculously evaded the now just slightly slowed assault of punches and somehow found it in himself to score a final takedown which must have sealed the deal in the eyes of the judges. He won a split decision. Although I’m convinced that it was Tindall who inflicted the greater damage and came closer to ending the fight, it is impossible to find anything unsatisfactory about such an amazing performance by both fighters. A truly great fight by two incredibly tough fighters.

The co-main event of the evening featured local hero Dan “The Dragon” Spohn in a matchup against a physical menace of a man in Aaron Mays of Clinton, Missouri. At 5’11”, Mays looked 50 pounds of solid muscle heavier than 205, massive even next to a physical specimen such as Spohn who routinely cuts in excess of 25 pounds and packs a cattle truck’s worth of lipid-free musculature on his 6’4” frame. Mays immediately scored a thunderous takedown and commenced to dishing out some of the most sickening ground and pound I’ve ever witnessed. Spohn was able to effectively protect his head, but his body took punches the mere sound of which was nauseating. A single punch from Mays would crush the rib cage of the average mortal, but mortal or not, there is nothing average about Dan Spohn. In what is submission grappling’s equivalent of a “flash” knockout, Spohn went from punching bag to executioner in an eye blink, expertly setting up and flawlessly executing a belly-down “Russian” arm bar that would make Fedor jealous. “Panic will make you lose and get hurt,” said Spohn to the crowd following his big win. “What’s the point?” Point well taken, but I for one, felt panic. Spohn by armbar, 2:41 of Round 1.

And finally, The Ultimate Fighter reality show alumnus, Columbus’ own Luke Zachrich put on a clinic, entertaining, amusing, and dazzling the hometown crowd with an at times almost light-hearted spectacle of Mixed Martial Artistry. After a feeling out process on the feet during which I believe Zachrich determined to his satisfaction that he held a considerable edge in striking skill, he began to mix it up with a virtual survey of MMA techniques, mixing up leg-kicks and boxing followed by an effortless initial takedown. Zachrich quickly demonstrated his creative grappling employing an unusually active, unorthodox and dynamic top-game, fearlessly and deftly turning his back on opponent Marcus Finch one moment and pivoting back into his half guard the next, all the while dishing out punishing ground and pound and seemingly looking for a novel submission. After some goading from Finch’s corner to the effect that Zachrich“just wants to wrestle,” Luke seemed determined to demonstrate his striking prowess and did so with equal aplomb. After some stiff jabs and a few sharp straight-rights he took control of the striking as well and seemed almost playful in attempting to execute something half-way between a scissors takedown and a flying heel-hook. Finch never gave up and worked hard looking for the big punch, but he was simply outclassed by a more skillful fighter.

All in all, it was a night of fights and fun the Buckeye State will not soon forget.

 

Joe Millin
ProFightingFans.com

The Ohio MMA faithful gathered Friday in the state capital of Columbus for a night of closely contested bouts that were a testament to the prowess of Ultimate Victory Challenge matchmaker Tyler Wooten, who assembled one of the best cards of the year.  It was the marquis Professional talent of some of The Buckeye State’s biggest guns that put the sparkle on a card stacked top to bottom, anchored by solid performances from some of the best Amateur talent from the area. The result was a night of fights that more than made up for a lack of flashy KO victories by pitting evenly matched opponents head to head, producing some of the more stylish and robust ground-fighting in recent memory.

Four spirited amateur contests kicked off the action, setting the stage for six pro bouts that eventually delivered fireworks culminating in stellar performances by the city’s native sons, Dan Spohn and Luke Zachrich in the co-main event and main events of the evening. MMA enthusiast Loper from 99.7 The Blitz’ “Loper and Randi in the Morning” served as emcee, riling up fans with his contagious mixture of intensity and love for the fight game, well matched by the styling’s of colorful ring announcer George Phillips. Add to it a patently fight and fan-friendly venue in the vibrant and well-appointed Aladdin Shrine Center, and more than a thousand rabid MMA fans of all shapes, sizes and colors, and UVC 23 – Invasion was a smashing success and the place to be last night.

AMATEUR BOUTS

DiSabatto MMA’s Jordan Schembri and LAMMA product Austin Durbin kicked off the action with a agonizing 2 minute, 10 second affair throughout which Durbin struggled for a single-leg takedown like his life depended on it, absorbing punishing strikes from Schembri all the while. When he finally let go the leg, Durbin quickly found himself on the wrong end of a powerful North/South choke, tapping out at 2:10 of the very first round.

Toward the end of a back and forth Round 1 featuring transitions and submission attempts from both fighters, Skrap House amateur journeyman Ronnie Shoemaker gained an advantage over LAMMA’s Jeff Dotson and went on to dominate Round 2, taking Dotson’s back and sinking in an unforgiving rear-naked choke to earn the tap at 1:38 of the second stanza.

The next two amateur bouts would both last the duration with undefeated local standouts Corey Dulaney and Robert McPherson pitting their perfect records against each other in a UVC Champion Series Lightweight Semi-final and amateur champ Aaron Hughes ending a 19-month layoff versus veteran Donny Korbel in a non-title icebreaker.

Dulaney v. McPherson heated up gradually with McPherson sporting superior technical chops in finally executing a sweep minutes into the first round and cinching up a neat triangle choke which a determined and physically dominant Dulaney rode out until the bell at the end of Round 1 brought merciful relief. The formidable athleticism and grinding pressure of Dulaney was gradually brought to bear when in the midst of Round 2 he executed a thunderous scoop and slam which seemed to be the tipping point. From there on, Dulaney out-muscled his opponent en route to a unanimous decision victory on the strength of his explosive power and superior control. The victory established Dulaney’s status as the number one contender at lightweight.

Ring rust may have been a factor in the return of Aaron “Livewire” Hughes in spite of what was an admirable performance in which he landed takedowns in multiple rounds and held top-control much of the bout. Still, it was the diverse attack of Donny “The Destroyer” Korbel that was the story of this one, the Team Chaos product showcasing a balanced arsenal of both striking and grappling. On the feet, Korbel used his rangy limbs with precision, mixing up leg-kicks with his hands, doing excellent body work and landing a heavy kick to the body before hurting Hughes with a straight-right to the breadbasket and finishing Round 1 in top position. Round 2 was a slugfest with some calculated brawling at the outset before Hughes sensed he was fighting to his opponent’s strengths and again took it to the mat. Here Hughes mounted his greatest real threat of the fight coming close with a guillotine choke before the bell.  Hughes quickly got the takedown and established dominant position from the outset of Round 3. He did little damage, however, thus it was again the more treacherous triangle choke/armbar with which Korbel nearly submitted and eventually swept Hughes that was the offensive highlight of the round for me. While he did spend much of the fight on his back, Korbel scored big fan points on my unofficial card for his stylish ground game, which allowed him to create reversals and submission attempts while sustaining very little damage.

The Judges Harry Heil and Darryl Wise scored the fight 29-28 in favor of Korbel while judge Jeannie McGinnis scored it 29-28 for Hughes. It was perhaps the most intellectually provocative fight of the evening for me in that it highlighted what are nagging frustrations with the scoring of MMA bouts. I would venture to guess that all 3 judges gave Round 2 to Korbel on the basis of his dominance in the striking in a round contested largely on the feet. And yet it was in Round 2 that Hughes came closest to ending the fight with a guillotine choke cut short by the bell. In Rounds 1 and 3, Hughes clearly held a preponderance of time in the top (dominant?) position, but did little damage due to Korbel’s offensive guard which produced both sweeps leading to full-mount and a near submission by triangle choke then armbar. In fact, the only time at which Korbel looked unstable was when Hughes rattled Korbel’s scrobles with a kick to the marbles before the fight hardly got started, which still must’ve smarted. But seriously, there is something to be said for offense that threatens to end a fight versus “dominance” which merely stagnates a fight by limiting the time that the “dominant” fighter is in immediate danger from a superior striker or submission grappler. And although a majority of judges (in my opinion), got the winner right, it’s probably reasonable to assume that one judge gave Hughes both Rounds 1 and 3, but not 2, and the other two gave Hughes only Round 1 or 3.  So if coming close to ending the fight counts for more than merely staying out of danger by controlling position, even the judges that got the score right most likely did so for the wrong reason. I would argue for a score of 30-27 in favor of Korbel as the damage inflicted with his strikes outweighed the near submission attempt. Live action is fast and furious and distractions cageside are many, so I reserve the right to change my mind upon viewing the televised rebroadcast, a luxury the judges do not enjoy. Suffice to say that imperfect though they sometimes may be, I do not envy their job in adjudicating closely fought decisions under an inherently flawed scoring system with ambiguous judging criteria. It’s a wonder they can sleep at night.

By Joe Millin

ProFightingFans.com

Mad Wolf Productions

Art of War 5 – Tournament of Champions

April 20, 2013

The buzz inside the Indy Indoor Sports Park was 4/20 with a shot of testosterone when Mad Wolf Productions brought its Art of War 5 – Tournament of Champions to a bigger, better venue Saturday in Indianapolis. The buzz only figures to intensify as the field is narrowed and tournament front-runners begin to emerge, making for stiffer and more determined competition. Exciting fights are shaping up and building inertia as the best prospects in each weight class eliminate the competition en route to claiming their belt.

Action began with 4 grappling and kickboxing exhibitions, which fans booed mercilessly due to the more restrictive rules and the “draw” decisions turned in by the judges. In defense of the judges cageside that night, it may be helpful to mention that all grappling exhibitions of this kind are automatically ruled a draw if neither fighter is forced to submit, even when one fighter is clearly dominant.

Trenton Lewis and Matthew Perry dominated their grappling matches and a very young Tristan Clawson turned in an impressive performance stopping a game opponent in Joey Holloway by TKO.

In the first MMA bout of the night, strawweights Patrick Best and Nick “Spider Monkey” Meneloa put on a striking spectacle in a wild back-and-forth contest that saw both fighters bruised and bloodied up. It was the superior hands of Patrick Best that began to take control as the fight wore on. The longer reach and crisper straight punches of “Lionheart” finally resulting in a brutal KO finish for Best at 1:02 of the 3rd Round.

Dustin Parrish protégé Nick Browning garnered Knockout of the Night honors with a very convincing flash KO of his opponent Jeremy Vandiver at just 41 seconds of the very 1st Round. Dragonfly MMA’s Browning hails from a celebrated Indiana fight team and he looks like a force to be reckoned with in the future at just 18 years of age. During his victory speech, poised and confident, Browning asked his girlfriend to prom in front of a charmed and amused audience. She said yes, making the young Browning a stud both in the cage and out.

Mason Howard ended his fight quickly and decisively with an impressive left high-kick to the head of his opponent, Tae Choi, who looked as if he spent much of the fight moving forward and throwing bombs with his head down and his eyes closed. His luck ran out at 1:03 of Round 2.

In a totally dominating performance, Chris Tanner soundly defeated Aaron LaLonde, running across the cage, taking his opponent to the mat and sinking in a vicious rear-naked choke only 38 seconds into the 1st Round. Tanner looks to be an early standout in the talent-rich 145 lb. division.

The fifth fight of the night between Justen Dowsett and Johnte Potts was the first to go to the judges’ scorecards, winning Fight of the Night honors for both combatants in this razor close contest. Potts set a frantic pace with aggressive striking, but it was the superior grappling and top control of Dowsett that swayed the judges’ opinions. Several submission attempts and dominant positions secured the decision for Dowsett, winning unanimously by a score of 29-28.

There was never a dull moment through the first five MMA bouts, 4 ending with flashy knockouts or submissions, and the last garnering Fight of the Night honors. When the intermission came, promoter Robert Woolf had more than covered his deductible for fight insurance and had even dispatched the attending ambulance and EMT’s to carry a woman to a nearby hospital as she went into labor during the fights and the baby simply would not wait. Local band “Self Addicted” provided a hard rock soundtrack for the intermission and can be seen locally this summer opening for Papa Roach.

Chey Gorsuch and Cy Norris kicked off the second group of fights treating fans to a very evenly-matched fight featuring some crazy scrambles and back-and-forth action. Gorsuch rocked his opponent early but Norris kept his cool, gaining superior position and eventually sinking in a rear-naked choke at 1:04 of Round 2. The fight was much more closely contested than the result suggests and I look for Chey to begin collecting marks in the “W” column as his confidence in his standup improves.

Evan Cooper kept calm, cool and collected in riding out a guillotine choke that lasted most of the 1st Round, eventually working free and submitting Darrin Hardin via rear-naked choke at 1:53 of Round 1.

Troy “The Terror” Tripp made perhaps the most menacing entrance of the night, walking out in a mask that held all the youngsters in attendance spellbound. Tripp dominated early but a big double-leg takedown for Brett Spinelle began to turn the tides in his favor. In spite of a razor close second round, the judges scored the bout unanimously in favor of Spinelle, seeing it 29-28, the last 2 rounds going to Spinelle.

American Top Team’s Matt Meyers and his very vocal corner man turned in a strategic and well-executed performance, cruising to a referee stoppage for strikes at 2:32 of the 2nd Round. Brady House fought hard but was simply overmatched, finally succumbing to strikes after some very heavy ground-n-pound.

In the 2nd shortest fight of the night, Brandon Hicks rushed opponent Damar Gibson stopping him in just 25 seconds with a brutal TKO victory.

Another swift submission victory ensued when Brad Woods defeated Kyle Jenkins via rear-naked choke at just 1:10 of the very 1st Round.

Chris Burchfield of Indiana’s Fisher’s BJJ and Boxing demonstrated persistence, finesse and technique in eking out a slick triangle choke at 1:47 of Round 1. Opponent Anthony Klinker worked hard to defend but Burchfield was determined and won Submission of the Night honors for his efforts in securing a beautifully executed choke.

In the co-main event, Sean Fallon left no questions concerning his dominance defeating Ramey Sykes in the blink of an eye as just 8 seconds had time to tick away before the referee was forced to wave him off. Fallon’s impressive win put every fighter at 170 on notice, improving his record to an impressive 7-3.

And in the final bout of the evening, main-event combatants Joe Hall and Branden Myers fought to an unspectacular unanimous decision victory. Hall controlled the action throughout, utilizing good leg kicks from the outset and dominating in both striking and grappling. Branden “Mad Dog” Myers never quite found his rhythm or let his hands go although he seemed to enjoy a reach and speed advantage. The judges scored the fight 30-27 in favor of the Ohio import, Joe Hall.

All in all, it was an exciting night of action that sets the stage for the promotions’ next event which takes place on May 25th in Indianapolis. That Memorial Day weekend card promises to up the ante on the competition, as the tournament action continues to intensify. Stay tuned for a preview of the May 25 event including fighter profiles and predictions.

 

By Joe Millin
ProFightingFans.com Local MMA Staff Writer

Fans of the local MMA circuit in the Midwest were treated to what was perhaps the best card in years from Indiana’s time-honored Hook-n-Shoot promotion Saturday in Evansville, Indiana. What was supposed to be an event featuring 4 women’s bouts saw it’s female constituent dwindle to a single fight which kicked off a multi-weight class WMMA 2013 tournament. Long known for its seminal role in WMMA, Hook-n-Shoot established itself early in the WMMA world during the 90’s and 2000’s, featuring cards loaded with A-List talent equaled in recent years only by those of the all-women’s Invicta FC. A little digging will reveal WMMA events in which the Hook-n-Shoot promotion featured such marquis names as Lisa Ward-Ellis, Jan Finney, Megumi Fujii, Roxanne Modafferi, Julie Kedzie and Tara LaRosa on a single fight card! A combination of injuries and other obstacles conspired to dismantle the women’s portion of the fight card Saturday in Evansville, nonetheless; Fightapalooza did not disappoint, showcasing local male talent including 3 championship fights.

 

Kevin “Scrappy” Schmidt vs. Richie “The Coal Miner” Kerner kicked off the night, with Kerner turning in one of the night’s most dominating victories against a very game opponent in Schmidt. Kerner showed a well-rounded striking and ground game, rocking his opponent early with the very first punch, a vicious right cross which landed with pinpoint accuracy sending Schmidt to the canvass. Kerner piled on the damage from top position, separating only once before taking his opponent’s back and sinking in a fight-ending rear-naked choke which sent a bloodied-up Schmidt to the locker rooms before he was ever able to implement his own game plan. Such a dominating performance from the previously 1-4 Kerner who looked huge at 135 not only earned him passage to the tournament semifinals but put the rest of the 135 lb. weight class on notice that he is the man to beat.

Kerner defeats Schmidt @ 2:33 of Round 1 via rear-naked choke

 

In a closely contested second bout of the evening, Johnte Potts vs. Joey Thompson was a back-and-forth battle featuring multiple submission attempts, heavy ground-n-pound and solid striking. In spite of a spirited effort from both combatants which saw Thompson achieve full-mount and attempt several submissions, it was Potts who eked out the decision on the judges score cards, once nearly ending the fight by rear-naked choke right at the bell for Round 1.

Potts defeats Thompson via split decision

 

Matthew Stern vs Raul Perez, the third bout of the evening, ended quickly after a power double-leg established dominant position for Matthew Stern who never let DFF Outlaw product, Raul Perez off the hook, moving first to side-control and then to mount before sinking in a nicely-executed armbar which earned the tap at 2:22 of the very first round. Stern’s grappling control was impressive allowing him to impose his will early and maintain dominance throughout.

Stern defeats Perez @ 2:22 of Round 1 via armbar submission

 

A combination of pre-fight jitters and an ill-timed meal conspired to bring Josh Kirkland vs. Christopher Henderson to a premature close when Kirkland blew chunks in the heat of Round 1, necessitating the Indiana Athletic Commission’s first official stoppage for mid-fight projectile-vomiting.

Henderson defeats Kirkland via referee stoppage due to illness

 

In another closely contested bout, Chris Brummett vs. Ryan Conaway featured a back-and-forth affair on the feet and ground. Although Brummett perhaps held a positional advantage during the early rounds, it was the striking and groundwork later in the fight that earned Conaway a narrow edge on the judge’s scorecards.

Conaway defeats Brummett via split decision

 

Caleb Purtlebaughvs. Richard Hazard was a whirlwind of furious striking in which the superior hand-speed and accuracy of Caleb Purtlebaugh prevailed, twice sending Hazard to the mat before finishing him with a fight-ending right hand in the 2nd frame.

Purtlebaugh defeats Hazard @ 0:22 of Round 2 via KO

 

Richard Poe vs.Wendel Shackelfordwas a fight that saw Poe struggle to keep his feet early due to an ill-timed kick, which Shackelford effectively caught, throwing his opponent to the canvas. Poe absorbed significant damage from strikes in gutting out a prolonged takedown attempt in which Shackelford was able to remain upright against the cage delivering a barrage of hammer-fists as an the unfazed Poe tried to complete the takedown. Shortly after separating, Shackelford sent Poe flailing to the canvas a second time and earned a stoppage from strikes although Poe still appeared to be fighting and in command of his wits. All in all, it was a convincing performance from Shackelford in spite of the hasty stoppage.

Shakelford defeats Poe @ 2:25of Round 1 via referee stoppage due to strikes

 

Up next, Devon Wright vs. Joey Tornatore was a hard-fought and evenly-matched standing war in which both fighters demonstrated solid stand-up skills and chins to match. As the fight wore on, the technical striking of Tornatore began to show through as Joey worked his jab effectively and began to gain a decisive edge. With a seemingly giant fan base in attendance rallying behind him to chants of “Joey, Joey!” Tornatore bloodied his opponent’s nose before landing a brutal right, ending the fight with a flash knockout to a deafening roar of applause. Perhaps the most exciting finish of the night goes to the local kid, Joey Tornatore and his very vocal fans.

Tornatore defeats Wright @ 1:54of Round 3 via KO

 

In Darrin Hardin vs. Carlos Garnett, both combatants put in a spirited performance but it was Garnett who mixed up his attack better, showcasing a varied and effect mixture of punches, kicks, spinning attacks and takedowns on route to a unanimous decision victory.

Garnett defeats Hardin via unanimous decision

 

In the sole surviving women’s action of the evening, Alyssa Vasquez vs. Melissa Blythwas a fast-paced affair in which Blyth gained an early takedown and advanced to mount only to be caught in a sudden and decisive power-guillotine by a cool-headed Alyssa Vasquez.

Vasquez defeats Blyth 1:17 in round 1 via guillotine choke

 

Far and away the highpoint of the night’s action featured Carmello“Rickey” Furar vs. William Calhoun, III in a barn-burner of a title fight at 155 lbs. Furar demonstrated sick cardio, thunderous takedowns and an iron chin, grinding his way to a razor-thin victory over an equally durable and well-conditioned Calhoun III. It would be difficult to overstate the striking prowess of the athletically gifted Calhoun who landed multiple successions of barbaricblows to the seemingly indestructible head of the relentless Furar. How anyone could continue to move forward undaunted under such a barrage of power strikes is a mystery of science and nature. At no time did either fighter appear to wilt under the pressure, Calhoun responding coolly with a calculated and aggressive Jiu-Jitsu attack off his back commencing immediately following even the most gut-wrenching body slams executed by the agile and powerful wrestler in Furar. That Calhoun was able to avoid sustaining much damage under the crushing top-game of such an elite and powerful opponent is a testament to his refinement as a martial artist and a cerebral approach even under the direst conditions. Equally impressive was Furar’s submission defense, narrowly escaping submission several times through a combination of awareness and brute strength. One could imagine that the judges scorecards might have been a reflection of their respective disciplines, the “wrestling” oriented judge scoring the fight 30-27 for Furar on the basis of his unyielding top control and earthshaking body slams; the “boxing” judge scoring the fight 29-30 (a highly-unusual score which can only indicate a 10-10 score in each of the first two rounds) in an attempt to leave room for the dazzling and bone-crushing striking of Calhoun to prevail in the last stanza; and the “traditional martial arts” oriented judge seeing it 29-28 in favor of Calhoun, whose electric striking and technical Jiu-Jitsu threatened to bring the fight to a decisive finish at any moment. In many respects, all three judges got it right; a spectacular and oh-so close contest. In the end, it was the chin and the determination of Furar that spelled the winning combination and one is left to wonder what it will take to beat such a fierce and durable competitor. I would walk over broken glass gladly to see a rematch of this one.

Furar defeats Calhoun via split decision

 

In another exciting fight, Joshua Stanley vs. Blake King Blair took up where Furar v. Calhoun left off, with two highly talented, gritty fighters going head to head in a battle of attrition. It was Stanley whose unerring fundamentals eventually garnered him the victory in a calm, calculated, journeyman-like performance. Stanley appeared to have no weaknesses showing expert takedown defense, a comprehensive submission defense and a game plan that left his opponent nowhere to play but into his strengths. One could literally see the very game and aggressive Blair deflate as his early takedown and submission attempts were systematically thwarted and Stanley’s superior striking and conditioning began to take over. By the end of Round 2, Stanley had utterly dismantled his opponent who appeared ready to throw in the towel. Blair answered the bell in the 3rd round at the urging of his corner but after one final attempt at a takedown, he completely crumbled at which point the ref mercifully stepped in. Stanley’s performance showed an unusual level of composure and strategy for a young fighter on a local stage and will make him a force to be reckoned with long into his bright future.

Stanley defeats Blair @0:51 of Round 3 via TKO

 

James Mottershead vs. Markus Hall

After what Markus Hall did to his last opponent, the colorful and entertaining James Mottershead has my full respect for stepping into the cage as a last-minute replacement in the main event of the evening. He was, however, no match for the formidable striking of Markus Hall who weathered an early storm of spirited strikes and submission attempts from his less-than-optimally prepared opponent en route to another in a growing streak of KO/TKO victories. Hall was simply on another level, being well trained and conditioned and otherwise prepared to take on all comers. Look for fan-favorite Markus Hall to continue his winning ways, earning a few more highlight-reel knockouts on his path to domination.

Hall defeats Mottershead @ 0:53 of Round 2 via TKO

 

By Joe Millin
ProFightingFans.com Regional MMA Reporter

(PRESS RELEASE) REVEL BEACH, N.J. – World Series of Fighting announced exciting Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) undercard action today, featuring local product Kris McCray (8-4) of Toms River, N.J. in a middleweight (185 pounds) scrap against battle-tested Danillo “Indio” Villefort (13-4) of Coconut Creek, Fla., and Waylon Lowe (13-4) of Philadelphia, Pa. squaring off with Cameron Dollar (11-4) of Colorado Springs, Colo. in a featherweight (145 pounds) tilt, from Ovation Hall atRevel in Atlantic City, N.J. on Saturday, March 23.

No strangers to Atlantic City, having fought there nine times (combined) professionally, Ozzy Dugulubgov (3-1) of Hackensack, N.J. will go up against undefeated prospect Chris Wade (5-0) of Long Island, N.Y. in a catchweight (160 pounds) bout.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt and welterweight (170 pounds) upstart Igor Gracie (5-3) of Rio de Janeiro will face Rich Patishnock (4-1) of Whippany, N.J.

The six-bout preliminary card will be topped by a featherweight collision between streaking Duke Roufus protégé Rick “The Gladiator” Glenn (12-2) of Milwaukee, Wisc., and undefeated submission specialist Alexandre”Pulga” Pimentel (12-0) of Rio de Janeiro.

A stacked main card will be televised live on NBC Sports Network, headlined by the heavyweight showdown between superstars Andrei “The Pitbull” Arlovski (19-9) of Minsk, Belarus and Anthony “Rumble” Johnson (15-3) of Boca Raton, Fla.

In the bantamweight (135 pounds) co-main event, red-hot 29-year-old star Tyson Nam (12-4) of Portland, Ore., will face off with two-time national Muay Thai champion and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt Marlon Moraes (9-4) of Jupiter, Fla., via Nova Friburgo, Brazil.

“We are excited to bring the World Series of Fighting brand of MMA to Atlantic City, where some of the greatest fights in history have taken place,” said World Series of Fighting President and six-time world kickboxing champion and two-time Hall of Famer, Ray Sefo.  “Andrei Arlovski, Anthony Johnson and Marlon Moraes are all coming off superb performances on our inaugural fight card, and Tyson Nam has been on fire of late, so we felt that it was essential to showcase these stars at the top of our first card on the East Coast.”

Also slated for action on the five-bout TV card are welterweight sensation Josh Burkman (24-9) of Salt Lake City, Utah, who will collide with former UFC star Aaron “A-Train” Simpson (12-4) of Phoenix, Ariz., and former PRIDE Fighting Championships superstar and WEC championPaulo Filho (23-4) of Rio de Janeiro, who will face off with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt David Branch (11-3) of Brooklyn, N.Y., in a middleweight bout.

Explosive finisher J.Z. Cavalcante (16-6) of Deerfield Beach, Fla., via Brazil, will take on unbeaten, emerging star Justin Gaethje (7-0) of Greeley, Colo., at lightweight (155 pounds).

Coming off his second consecutive victory, a unanimous decision over Mike “300” Hayes Dec. 16, Arlovski, a 33-year-old, 6-foot-4-inch, former UFC heavyweight champion, shined in the main event of the inaugural World Series of Fighting card Nov. 3 in Las Vegas, crumbling fellow power puncher Devin Cole with a barrage of blows in the first round (2:37).

Likewise, the 28-year-old, 6-foot-2-inch Johnson dominated D.J. “Da Protégé” Linderman in the first-ever World Series of Fighting co-main event, scoring a first-round (3:58) KO of Linderman with a punch.  The victory was Johnson’s fourth straight.

Nam made waves Aug. 25 when he pulled off a stunning upset on reigning Bellator bantamweight champion Eduardo Dantas, scoring a first-round (1:36) KO (punch) in a non-title bout in Brazil.  Nam will put a four-fight win streak on the line in his World Series of Fighting debut.

The 24-year-old Moraes shocked the world on the first World Series of Fighting card, beating former WEC champion Miguel Torres to the punch repeatedly for the majority of three rounds en route to being being awarded a split decision victory.  The win was Moraes’ third straight.

Tickets, priced from $39, are on sale and available for purchase at all Ticketmaster locations (800-745-3000) and at Ticketmaster.com.

Doors at Ovation Hall at Revel will open at 5:30 p.m. EST and the first preliminary card bout will begin at 6:30 p.m.

The live NBC Sports Network telecast of the World Series of Fighting event will begin at 9:30 p.m. EST/6:30 p.m. PST.